History of Oak Ridge in Photos

For anyone growing up in the East Tennessee area, the city of Oak Ridge has always been know as the “secret city”. And in 1942, as part of the Manhattan Project, the U.S. government acquired 70,000 acres of land in Eastern Tennessee and established a secret town called Oak Ridge. The name chosen to keep outside speculation to a minimum, because Oak Ridge served a vital role for the development of the atomic bomb. The massive complex of massive factories, administrative buildings and every other place a normal town needs to function, was developed for the sole purpose of separating uranium for the Manhattan Project. The completely planned community was designed by the architecture firm of Skidmore, Owings and Merrill, and had a population of more than 70,000 people. Due to the sensitive nature of the work at Oak Ridge, the entire town was fenced in with armed guards and the entire place — much like the Manhattan Project in general — was a secret of the highest concern. Recently, the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge office recently started to digitize its collection of archival photos and share them through Flickr. Most of these photos were taken by Ed Westcott, the only person allowed to photograph the Oak Ridge reservation during the Manhattan Project.

Link: DOE’s Oak Ridge Photostream

The Great Recovery is Coming!

The Great Recovery is a grassroots movement spread by people who are tired of looking to Washington for answers. The truth is that the government can’t fix this economy. It’ll be restored one family at a time, as each of us takes a stand to return to God and grandma’s way of handling money.

Together, we’ll bring this country back on track—one family, one church, one community at a time.

Join Dave Ramsey on Thursday,  July 21, as he addresses leaders from around the nation! You can register to watch Dave’s free message at http://www.thegreatrecovery.com/.

Charity Spotlight – Mission of Hope

The Mission of Hope concentrates on serving people throughout poverty stricken rural areas of Appalachia in Southeast Kentucky and Northeast Tennessee. To accomplish their goals of providing assistance, the Mission of Hope seeks supplies, resources, monetary donations and grants from individuals, businesses, corporations, service groups and civic organizations. The Mission of Hope then distributes donated items and purchased materials to areas of rural Appalachia where they are then delivered to needy individuals and families through the support of school resource centers and local ministries, already established within the communities which they serve.

The Mission of Hope is a year round ministry that assists many of our Appalachian neighbors with much needed goods and resources; college scholarships; and help with basic educational, health care and home repair needs. There are lots of ways that you can help the Mission of Hope. One of the most important ways you can help is to keep their ministry and those they serve in your prayers. There are also numerous opportunities to volunteer your time both in their Knoxville office and warehouse and in the areas they serve. Of course, monetary donations are always a great way to help as it allows them to use the funds where it is needed most.

Resource Links: MOH Facebook Page ~~ MOH Twitter Feed ~~ WBIR Interview with Emmette Thompson

Charity Spotlight – The Dream Connection

The Dream Connection is a non-profit organization dedicated to fulfilling the special dreams of children ages 3-18 who are faced with life threatening or chronically debilitating illnesses in the East Tennessee area. A “dream come true” to a child can give back, in some small way, that which disease and illness have taken away. Its goal is to accept and raise charitable contributions exclusively for fulfilling the “once-in-a-lifetime dream come true” of children between the ages of three and eighteen, with life-threatening or chronically debilitating illnesses in the East Tennessee community. It is dedicated to directing 100% of its contributions to fulfilling the dreams of the children it serves. As the only organization of its kind in East Tennessee, The Dream Connection is the result of a group of volunteers who realized the need for an organization dedicated to fulfilling the special dreams of children battling life-threatening or chronically debilitating illnesses. 25 years and hundreds of dreams later, The Dream Connection continues to fulfill the dreams of children diagnosed with leukemia, muscular dystrophy, cerebral palsy, and other conditions.About 60 to 75 dreams are fulfilled per year through the support of individuals, businesses, and civic organizations.

Charity Spotlight – Ronald McDonald House

The Ronald McDonald House of Knoxville provides a “home away from home” for families of seriously ill children receiving treatment at nearby hospitals. The House provides a comfortable, supportive, temporary residence near the medical facility where family members can sleep, eat, relax and find support from other families in similar situations. Knoxville’s Ronald McDonald House has been serving families of sick and injured children since 1985.

There are numerous ways in which you can help the Ronald McDonald House: Monetarily, become a volunteer, bring items from their Wish List, participate in upcoming events, or check out their list of  other ways to help.

Resource Links: RMH Web Site ~~ RMH Facebook Page ~~ RMH Twitter Feed

Charity Spotlight – American Eagle Foundation

The American Eagle Foundation (AEF) is a non-profit organization founded in 1985 to develop and conduct bald eagle and environmental recovery programs in the United States and to assist private, state and federal projects that do the same. Their goal is to fully restore the bald eagle, the U.S.A.’s National Symbol, to America’s lands and skies and to “Build A Nest-Egg” for their future care and protection. AEF is headquartered at the Dollywood entertainment park in Pigeon Forge, TN.

The American Eagle Foundation has a live-feed Eagle Nest Cam setup on their web site for people to view several of the non-releasable bald eagles. Recently, while tending to their nesting duties, non-releasable Bald Eagles “Franklin” and “Independence”, survived tornado-like storms that passed through the East Tennessee area.

AEF President Al Cecere watched the eagle nest day and night from a video camera available over the internet during those severe storms. Cecere said, “It always amazes me how the parent birds faithfully cover the eggs and young with their body and wings during severe weather, even when chunks of hail are pounding on their backs.”

The first of three eggs laid in March, which both parents have been diligently incubating and shielding from inclement weather over the past few weeks, hatched on the day of the Royal Wedding (April 29). The second egg could hatch any day.

Source: American Eagle Foundation